"...the Imagination (or love, or sympathy, or any other sentiment) induces knowledge, and knowledge of an 'object' which is proper to it..."
Henry Corbin (1903-1978) was a scholar, philosopher and theologian. He was a champion of the transformative power of the Imagination and of the transcendent reality of the individual in a world threatened by totalitarianisms of all kinds. One of the 20th century’s most prolific scholars of Islamic mysticism, Corbin was Professor of Islam & Islamic Philosophy at the Sorbonne in Paris and at the University of Teheran. He was a major figure at the Eranos Conferences in Switzerland. He introduced the concept of the mundus imaginalis into contemporary thought. His work has provided a foundation for archetypal psychology as developed by James Hillman and influenced countless poets and artists worldwide. But Corbin’s central project was to provide a framework for understanding the unity of the religions of the Book: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. His great work Alone with the Alone: Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn ‘Arabi is a classic initiatory text of visionary spirituality that transcends the tragic divisions among the three great monotheisms. Corbin’s life was devoted to the struggle to free the religious imagination from fundamentalisms of every kind. His work marks a watershed in our understanding of the religions of the West and makes a profound contribution to the study of the place of the imagination in human life.

Search The Legacy of Henry Corbin: Over 800 Posts

Monday, January 22, 2018

Keep an eye on the Webstore!

New Designs Are Coming

Check out the Henry Corbin Collection & More






Wednesday, January 17, 2018

An Important New Book on the Imaginal




Metaphor and Imaginal Psychology
A Hermetic Reflection

Marc Slavin




Metaphor and Imaginal Psychology: A Hermetic Reflection provides the first full-length exploration of the significance of metaphor in post-Jungian psychology. Its portrayal of the mythological figure of Hermes as a personification of metaphor marks an original contribution to the field of metaphor studies.

After a 2,500-year exile from philosophy and related areas of study, beginning with Plato’s ejection of the poets from the ideal city-state, metaphor is today experiencing a season of renewal. Among the fields where its significance as a way of seeing, thinking, and feeling has been especially prominent is archetypal psychology, perhaps the most philosophically attuned of psychological disciplines.

Approaching the work of James Hillman and other key archetypal psychologists from a poststructuralist perspective, Metaphor and Imaginal Psychology draws insightful comparisons between archetypal psychology and the deconstructive philosophy of Jacques Derrida, a principle theorist of metaphor’s philosophical resurgence.

By linking two disciplines that might at first appear as strange bedfellows, Metaphor and Imaginal Psychology underscores the influence of metaphor in reason and emotion, and makes a compelling case for the Mercurial ethos of our postmodern world. Aside from representing essential reading for therapists and theorists working in post-Jungian studies, the book will appeal to readers, students and scholars of literary criticism, psychology, philosophy and mythology.


"Slavin’s book opens the space for a much-needed conversation in post-Jungian studies. This book performs a rather difficult feat: it articulates a rigorous academic and philosophic approach to metaphor while remaining true to the Hermetic spirit which it explicitly espouses. This text, with its profundity and playfulness, constitutes a true invocation of the senex-et-puer constellation. It bridges disciplines which have thus far flirted with connecting but have failed to do so in a consistent way. This book is a window through which poststructuralists and imaginal psychologists can look into each other’s ideas and actually begin to talk." - Gustavo Beck, Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico


Sunday, January 14, 2018

Ibn Arabi's Thinking on the Imagination and the World of Image


We have this news from Dr. van Lit:



L.W. Cornelis (Eric) van Lit

New Research Project: Ibn Arabi's Thinking on the Imagination and the World of Image

Dr. Cornelis van Lit, of Utrecht University, has been awarded a grant by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research to conduct four years of research on the notion of the imagination according to Ibn ʿArabī and his commentators. 'Imagination' is a central concept for Ibn ʿArabī, and this has certainly not gone unnoticed by scholars. However, a great amount of relevant literature remains extant only in manuscripts, virtually untouched, something Dr. Van Lit wishes to remedy. Moreover, Dr. Van Lit approaches the topic as a historian of philosophy, whereas most scholars working on Ibn ʿArabī come with expertise in sufism or mysticism. Dr. Van Lit previously wrote on a similar medieval discussion, among the philosopher Suhrawardī and his commentators (The World of Image in Islamic Philosophy, published by Edinburgh University Press). Most recently he published in the Journal of the Muhyiddin Ibn Arabi Society on the difference (and similarity) between Suhrawardī and Ibn ʿArabī on the notion of a 'world of image' (ʿālam al-mithāl). 

Do you have specific ideas about this topic? Do you know somebody who is working on a similar topic? Or do you have access to sources perhaps relevant for this project? Cornelis wants to hear from you. Please contact him by e-mail, Facebook, Academia profile, or his weblog. For more information, see https://digitalorientalist.com/ibn-arabis-reshaping-of-the-muslim-imagination/


Monday, January 1, 2018

From the Iran Book News Agency - Dariush Shayegan on Proust!



“Proust Night” program to unveil ‘Magic Lantern of Time’



Published Sunday 31 December 2017 - 19:22
IBNA- The program, “Night of Marcel Proust” will be held in Tehran where the book ‘Magic Lantern of Time’ by eminent Iranian philosopher Dariush Shayegan will be unveiled.

According to IBNA correspondent, the program which is scheduled for Monday, January 1 in Ferdowsi Hall of House of Thinkers in Tehran, has been organized by Bukhara Magazine and Farhang-e Mo’aaser publishing.

‘Magic Lantern of Time’ describes and interprets Marcel Proust’s reflections in his masterpiece novel ‘In Search of Lost Time’. As well as Shayegan, the program will be attended by Iranian writers and scholars Mahmoud Dowlatabadi, Kamran Faani, Hamed Fouladvand and Ali Dehbashi.

Sahyegan is a thinker whose ideas for his works in the field of comparative philosophy are particularly reputed in France. He studied in France under Henry Corbin in Paris and has carried out several extensive researches on Persian mysticism and mystic poetry.

  

Tuesday, December 19, 2017

Arabic MSS ex libris Henry Corbin at the Bibliotheque Nationale of Paris





Corbin's Arabic library has been photographed and the texts can be read online or are available for download. Amazing resource.


or 


Thanks to
N. Wahid Azal
for the information.



Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Traces of Henry Corbin





The mysticism and influences of Sufi culture in Pakistan and India 
hold a fascination for French scholar Michel Boivin

Published: 13:41 December 13, 2017 Gulf News
By Syed Hamad AliSpecial to Weekend Review

***





TEHRAN _  In keeping with our genial and friendly conversations with the Outstanding Scholars of Philosophy (Chehreh-ye Mandegar), we intended to talk to Gholam Hossein Ebrahimi Dinani about his memoires, his school days at the Hojatieh School in Qom, his relationship and association with Toshihiko Izutsu, Henry Corbin and other outstanding philosophers. However, our interview changed direction and we talked about other issues.

By Sara Faraji / Somaye Rezaei
December 13, 2017
Teheran Times



Thursday, December 7, 2017

New from Carl Ernst




by Carl W Ernst

This collection of articles by Carl W Ernst summarizes over 30 years of research, recovering and illuminating remarkable examples of Islamic culture that have been largely overlooked, if not forgotten. It opens with reflections on teaching Islam, focusing on major themes such as Sufism, the Qur’an, the Prophet Muhammad, and Arabic literature. The importance of public scholarship and the questionable opposition between Islam and the West are also addressed. The articles that follow explore multiple facets of Sufism, the ethical and spiritual tradition that has flourished in Muslim societies for over a thousand years. The cumulative effect is to move away from static Orientalist depictions of Sufism and Islam through a series of vivid and creative case studies.


Carl W. Ernst is a specialist in Islamic studies, with a focus on West and South Asia. His published research, based on the study of Arabic, Persian, and Urdu, has been mainly devoted to the study of three areas: general and critical issues of Islamic studies, premodern and contemporary Sufism, and Indo-Muslim culture. He has received research fellowships from the Fulbright program, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, and he has been elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His publications, which have received several international awards, include Rethinking Islamic Studies: From Orientalism to Cosmopolitanism (co-edited with Richard Martin, 2010); Following Muhammad: Rethinking Islam in the Contemporary World (2003); and Teachings of Sufism (1999).

He is the William R. Kenan, Jr., Distinguished Professor (2005- ) and Co-Director of the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations. He and Bruce Lawrence are co-editors of the Islamic Civilization and Muslim Networks Series at the University of North Carolina Press.


Monday, December 4, 2017

Important New Book!


Be sure to read part of the final chapter via the Look Inside option on amazon.



Thick and Dazzling Darkness
Religious Poetry in a Secular Age

Peter O'Leary



How do poets use language to render the transcendent, often dizzyingly inexpressible nature of the divine? In an age of secularism, does spirituality have a place in modern American poetry? In Thick and Dazzling Darkness, Peter O’Leary reads a diverse set of writers to argue for the existence and importance of religious poetry in twentieth- and twenty-first-century American literature. He traces a poetic genealogy that begins with Whitman and Dickinson and continues in the work of contemporary writers to illuminate an often obscured but still central spiritual impulse that has shaped the production and imagination of American poetry.

O’Leary presents close and comprehensive readings of the modernist, late-modernist, and postmodern poets Robinson Jeffers, Frank Samperi, and Robert Duncan, as well as the contemporary poets Joseph Donahue, Geoffrey Hill, Fanny Howe, Nathaniel Mackey, Pam Rehm, and Lissa Wolsak. Examining how these poets drew on a variety of traditions, including Catholicism, Gnosticism, the Kabbalah, and mysticism, the book considers how modern and contemporary poets have articulated the spiritual in their work. O’Leary also argues that an anxiety of misunderstanding exists in the study and writing of poetry between secular and religious impulses and that the religious nature of poets’ works is too often marginalized or misunderstood. Examining the works of a specific poet in each chapter, O’Leary reveals their complexity and offers a defense of the value and meaning of religious poetry against the grain of a secular society.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Peter O’Leary is the author of Gnostic Contagion: Robert Duncan and the Poetry of Illness (2002), as well as several books of poetry, most recently The Sampo (2016), and he is the editor of a new edition of Ronald Johnson’s ARK (2013). He teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Chicago.


Thursday, November 16, 2017

Spring 2018 Lecture/Workshop




with
Tom Cheetham


June 1 & 2, 2018
The C.G. Jung Center
Brunswick, Maine

Draft Description - Subject to Change

Friday Evening Lecture


Not a Science But a Story
Imagination & the Lumen Natura


We begin with a meditation on Jung's Red Book and the nature of imagination in art, psychology and religion. In his essays on Picasso and Joyce, Jung expressed "intense irritation." He treated them, Sonu Shamdasani tells us, like "crazy brothers" whose works are "way too close for comfort as they approach a similar terrain from a different vertex." He thought they were playing a dangerous game. "He recognizes the motifs from his own experience, but he still judges it as crazy" because "they appear to be exalting, reveling in it. The nekyia becomes a bacchanal." It offends him as "almost sacrilegious" and "a send-up of the holiest mysteries." He didn't consider that the dedication of these radical artists might be a religious act itself. Shamdasani then makes a critically important point: "[Jung] also doesn't see the extent to which the form of presentation within Picasso and Joyce is sufficient unto itself. There's a lumen natura, to borrow one of the alchemical expressions Jung himself uses, already within the image, There's a translucency that doesn't require anything else… [But] for Jung, it's insufficient." Whole cosmologies, cultures and forms of life revolve around the way we understand this lumen natura. What is this translucency? What is it sufficient for? And why was it insufficient for Jung? What was he looking for? What should we be searching for? Drawing on the work of James Hillman, Henry Corbin and a range of contemporary poets and artists, we'll address questions about the nature of the lumen natura and why Jung refused to think of the Red Book as "art."

Saturday Lecture


Wonders to Behold
Henry Corbin, Gaston Bachelard & the Blaze of Reality


A recurring phrase in the archaic Greek of the Iliad and the Odyssey is thauma idesthai: a wonder to behold. These incandescent marvels occupy the boundary between humans and the gods. Scholar Vered Lev Kenaan tells us that this experience of wonder "requires a mode of perception that involves recognition of the hidden, invisible, and divine dimension of things [and] is accompanied by a sense of danger." The anthropologist Stanley Diamond argued that an archaic sense of immersion in reality is common to the people of non-technological cultures, to artists and to mystics. They share a heightened awareness of reality that "commands a focus on the singularity of the object to such a degree that everything seems at once marvellous, strange, familiar and unexpected. No category can exhaust such an object; it saturates the perceiving subject… for [the artist] the object has become incandescent." The contemporary phenomenologist Jean-luc Marion has called such events "saturated phenomena." They "appear in full authority, in full glory, as the first morning of a world." They are unforeseeable, dazzling, unconditional and paradoxical. Marion insists they are not mystical limit cases, but rather the most fully realized experience of the bare phenomenon. Such a being "appears without the limits of a horizon and without reduction to an I." In Buddhist cultures such an egoless and unbounded openness is enlightenment. The 13th century Japanese Zen master Dōgen Zenji wrote: "To carry yourself forward and experience myriad things is delusion. That myriad things come forth and experience themselves is awakening." This intensity of experience lies at the root of the mystery of the sacred. Referring to tale of the Burning Bush, Father Pavel Evdokimov lamented that today “we have lost the flame of things and the secret content of simple reality.” How can we recover a sense of reality that both humbles and empowers us and wakens us to the continuous mystery and beauty of merely being alive?
We can go a long way towards answering that question by attending to the life and work of two of the 20th century's great champions of the imagination, Gaston Bachelard (1884-1962) and Henry Corbin (1903-1978). They, like Jung, shared a fascination with an alchemical vision of fire, light and transformation. Bachelard discovered in Corbin's work an impassioned example of the fire of imagination that he had been meditating on for many years. We will examine the allied but contrasting visions of Jung, Corbin and Bachelard and use their work to help open ourselves to forms of life and thought that can free us to experience the blaze of reality in all things.


Tuesday, November 7, 2017

New from Peter O'Leary



Thick and Dazzling Darkness

Religious Poetry in a Secular Age

Peter O'Leary


November 2017

How do poets use language to render the transcendent, often dizzyingly inexpressible nature of the divine? In an age of secularism, does spirituality have a place in modern American poetry? In Thick and Dazzling Darkness, Peter O’Leary reads a diverse set of writers to argue for the existence and importance of religious poetry in twentieth- and twenty-first-century American literature. He traces a poetic genealogy that begins with Whitman and Dickinson and continues in the work of contemporary writers to illuminate an often obscured but still central spiritual impulse that has shaped the production and imagination of American poetry.

O’Leary presents close and comprehensive readings of the modernist, late-modernist, and postmodern poets Robinson Jeffers, Frank Samperi, and Robert Duncan, as well as the contemporary poets Joseph Donahue, Geoffrey Hill, Fanny Howe, Nathaniel Mackey, Pam Rehm, and Lissa Wolsak. Examining how these poets drew on a variety of traditions, including Catholicism, Gnosticism, the Kabbalah, and mysticism, the book considers how modern and contemporary poets have articulated the spiritual in their work. O’Leary also argues that an anxiety of misunderstanding exists in the study and writing of poetry between secular and religious impulses and that the religious nature of poets’ works is too often marginalized or misunderstood. Examining the works of a specific poet in each chapter, O’Leary reveals their complexity and offers a defense of the value and meaning of religious poetry against the grain of a secular society.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Peter O’Leary is the author of Gnostic Contagion: Robert Duncan and the Poetry of Illness (2002), as well as several books of poetry, most recently The Sampo (2016), and he is the editor of a new edition of Ronald Johnson’s ARK (2013). He teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Chicago.



Friday, October 13, 2017

"This Vast Earth: Ibn 'Arabi's Ecology of Consciousness"

Conference website
 
Friday, Nov 10, 2017
Founders Room, Carillo Recreation Center

100 East Carillo Street
Santa Barbara, CA, 93101
  • 7:00pm Welcome
  • 7:10pm Keynote Speech: Michael Sells
  • 7:45pm Selected Readings from the poetry of Ibn ‘Arabi
  • 8:00pm Performance by musicians from UCSB Middle East Ensemble
Saturday, Nov 11, 2017
McCune Room

6020 Humanities and Social Sciences Building
El Colegio Rd
UC Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106
  • 9:00am Welcome
  • 9:15am - 12:10pmPlenary Session
  • 12:10pm Lunch
  • 1:30pm - 4:30pmWorkshops
  • 4:30pm Panel Discussion
  • 5:00pm End
 

2017 Annual conference

"This Vast Earth:
Ibn 'Arabi's Ecology of Consciousness"

November 10-11, 2017
UC Santa Barbara, California, USA

As one of history’s greatest universal mystics and interpreters of the human condition, Ibn ’Arabi’s teachings offer a window into a form of Islam that the West is rarely exposed to, as well as a more sophisticated understanding of the more exalted aspects of the Islamic cultural heritage.
This conference will explore Ibn 'Arabi's ideas on consciousness with particular focus on his articulation of the "Vast Earth" as a living reality, and the landscape through which the awakened human travels.
The Ibn 'Arabi Society is pleased to partner this year with the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at UCSB 

Registration

Don't miss this special evening of spoken word and music.
  • Hear Michael Sells' keynote speechSpeaking Stone: Kaʿba, Love, Talk, and Consciousness in the Writings of Ibn ʿArabi
  • Hear to poetry readings in the original Arabic, and Michael Sells' incomparable translations into English, recited by John Mercer
  • Hear members of UCSB's own Middle East Ensemble
Register for the Friday Night Concert and Keynote, or for the Full Conference which includes Friday and Saturdayevents.

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Purpose Summit


Join the Purpose Summit for FREE!
Video Interviews with top experts
Starts Sept 10th
Hi Friends -
I was interviewed recently for the Purpose Summit which begins this Sunday September 10th.  In my video interview I shared my perspective on the subjects of: purpose, soul, purpose discovery work, the pitfalls along the path to purpose embodiment and more.  The interviewer has read Corbin and 4 of my books.  His questions elicited some interesting facets of my work and I think you'll find edifying.

I invite you to join this FREE online event which starts this Sunday Sept 10th.  You'll get a new video in your inbox every weekend with an engaging interview on the subject of purpose.

Tom Cheetham
Here's what you'll experience during the summit:
  • Intimate interviews, giving you a taste of each expert's take on the subject of purpose, soul and cultural transformation.
  • Insight into a variety of practices and techniques that support you to discover your soul's deep purpose.
  • Directions on how you can find and embrace a life of true impact.
How the Summit works:

Every weekend you receive an email with a link to a fresh interview.  After 7 days, the video will be replaced by the next weekly inspirational interview.



Are you ready to learn from those who have discovered their own soul level purpose?  

Now is the time for you to fully inhabit your raw, authentic nature and channel the electric force that emanates from the center of your being.


You are invited to join the Purpose Summit.
It's totally free.
Each week a new video will pop into your inbox.

*

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Truth etc... and N. Berdyaev


A pre-history of post-truth, East and West
MARCI SHORE
1 September 2017

In 2014, Russian historian Andrei Zubov was fired from his Moscow professorship for comparing Putin’s annexation of Crimea to Hitler’s annexation of the Sudetenland.1 Two years later, at a festival in the post-industrial Czech city of Ostrava, Zubov spoke to a large audience about the task of historians. ‘My dolzhni govorit’ pravdu’, he said. We should speak the truth. This declaration – all the more so when uttered in Zubov’s baritone – sounded quaint, even old-fashioned. In particular, the Slavic word pravda – truth – invoked with no qualification and no prefix, suggested a bygone era. Who believed in truth anymore?

The end of ‘The End of History’ arrived together with the end of belief in reality. The Cold War world was a world of warring ideologies; in the twenty-first century, both American capitalism and post-Soviet oligarchy employ the same public relations specialists catering to gangsters with political ambitions. As Peter Pomerantsev described in Nothing is True and Everything is Possible, in the Russia of the 2000s, distinguishing between truth and lies became passé. In this world of enlightened, postmodern people, ‘everything is PR’.

Reality television has rendered obsolete the boundary between the fictional and the real. Truth is a constraint that has been overcome; ‘post-truth’ has been declared ‘word of the year.’ In Washington, the White House shamelessly defends its ‘alternative facts’. At the beginning, American journalists were taken off-guard: they had been trained to confirm individual pieces of information, not to confront a brazen untethering from empirical reality. The New Yorker captured the desperation with a satire about the fact-checker who passed out from exhaustion after the Republican debate. He had to be hospitalized; apparently no one replaced him. READ MORE


WITH THIS REFERENCE OF INTEREST:

"In the wake of the Stalinist Terror, the Russian philosopher Nikolai Berdyaev wrote an essay titled ‘The Paradox of the Lie.’ The lie was the condition that allowed totalitarianism to come into being, asserted Berdyaev. In his experience, this lie was an expression of the deep deformation of human consciousness; as a result of this deformation, individual conscience fled ever more from the world."

I've made a more readable version available here.




Saturday, July 22, 2017

Item of interest





LISTENING TO AYAHUASCA

by Rachel Harris, PhD



New Hope for Depression, Addiction, PTSD, and Anxiety



Used for thousands of years by indigenous tribes of the Amazon rain forest, the mystical brew ayahuasca is now becoming increasingly popular in the West. Psychologist Rachel Harris here shares her own healing experiences and draws on her original research (the largest study of ayahuasca use in North America) into the powerful medicine’s effects on depression, addiction, PTSD, and anxiety. In this wide-ranging and personal exploration, Harris details ayahuasca’s risks and benefits, helping readers clarify their intentions and giving psychotherapists a template for transformative care and healing.